Feral Fruit, Palestinian Permaculture and More!

Tortoise at Bustan Qaraaqa permaculture farm in the West Bank

Tortoise at Bustan Qaraaqa permaculture farm in the West Bank

Wow! I’m almost at 90 comments now for my last post, in which I got down on my green knees and begged you dear readers for help in finding a book title. I can’t thank you enough, they were all great.

Unfortunately, my publishers — who I love, by the way, don’t get me wrong — still haven’t decided on anything, but I’ll let you know as soon as possible what the winning words are.

In the mean time, as Crunchy already mentioned, I recently wrote about her and Sharon‘s posts on how men and women approach peak oil. Ah, but I didn’t write about it here. Instead, it was for the National Post — specifically, the Footprint page — where I now have a column called Sense & Sustainability (now that’s a good title, eh?).

Normally, I wouldn’t cross-promote myself because it’s more than a bit self-indulgent. However, the Footprint site is decent, and while I’m unfortunately pretty crap at updating Green as a Thistle on a regular basis, I do often write about cool stuff for the Post, such as environmental do-gooding in politically torn regions like the Middle East and the feral fruit phenomenon (thanks for that tip, Chile!). You can even scroll through the videos and watch me doing silly things like jumping out of Jacob‘s dad’s apple tree (I was desperate for a shooting location… Oh, and the berries I thought were blackberries might actually be loganberries, at least according to my mother… and my mother is always right).

So go forth! Read about how some crazy Brits are recycling water in Beit Sahour, how a couple of Toronto guys put on a comedy show called An Inconvenient Musical, how easy it is to make a feral fruit map, and more. Maybe browse the Ampersand and the Appetizer ’cause they’re OK, too, but don’t waste your time on any of that right-wing editorial nonsense. Just come straight back here and give me more title suggestions!

Kidding! Kidding.

Photo above courtesy of the Bustan Qaraaqa peeps at Green Intifada.

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3 Responses to Feral Fruit, Palestinian Permaculture and More!

  1. Chile says:

    Thanks for the mention, Vanessa! The only thing I would add to feral fruit harvesting is to strongly advise checking with the homeowner if the plant is actually on private property.

    A good friend lives in a neighborhood with lots of citrus trees in the front yards. The homeowners get very irate with the theft of their fruit. In fact, one went so far as to put a sign up in the tree:

    “I pay for the water and the fertilizer, and I prune and take care of this tree. The fruit is not for you!”

    My friend spotted two ladies butchering her pomegranate tree just last week with snippers while harvesting her fruit. She went out and stopped them, telling them that she would have been glad to share had they asked, but taking without asking was stealing.

    So, always ask first!

  2. Guy says:

    For you and your local readers, The Music Garden on Queens Quay is full of Saskatoon berry bushes and in four years I’ve only ever once come across anyone eating any. (And Charlie, my dog, and I are over there at least once a day.) Mostly they just rot on the stems and the birds pick up the rest off the ground. The fruit is out now but not quite ripe (they are still red and haven’t turned purple yet).

  3. Going Green says:

    There’s nothing wrong with a bit of cross-promotion. It helps everybody and enables you to spread your messages to a wider audience.

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